#MyBrands Experiment: The Results

Brands_Pic.jpg

Last month to prove the importance of manging your reputation on Twitter, I decided to run an experiment to see how well the brands in my life ran their Twitter accounts.

This is because whether you like it or not, people are talking about your brand online and these people cannot be ignored, good or bad, these are customers you want to keep happy. I choose to tweet the next 50 brands I encountered in my day-to-day activities, most with 'positive words' and some with complaints to see if they acknowledged my tweet.

We all see, encounter and engage with hundreds of brands every day, so obviously I will missed a fair few in the experiment. However, wherever I was consciously thinking or interacting with a brand, I would send a tweet with #MyBrands

The response has been extremely interesting. I didn't know how much it would effect my opinion of a brand if they interacted with me or ignored me, but it really did! Here are the results...

THE FACTS

  1. Total number of brands tweeted: 50
  2. Total number of brands interacting: 16
  3. Interaction percentage: 32%
  4. Total Replies: 14
  5. Total Retweets: 5
  6. Total Favourites: 1

MY FINDINGS

Firstly, the most important factor I found from this test, is how rewarding it felt to be acknowledged by a brand you like. I feel that replies are the most personal because they show the social media manager has taken some time to read what you have said and replied to you. I find that 'favourites' are slightly pointless on Twitter, because nobody can see them! Most replies I received from brands were fun and upbeat and made me smile. I especially liked Fosters 'Good Call - Happy Friday'.

It was also interesting to see the importance of Twitter for customer service. If customers are tweeting brands and receiving no response, it is effectively the same as walking into a store and being ignored by the sales assistants. Out of the few brands I tweeted complaining or asking for help, all of them replied.

For example, I lost my Sekonda watch and wanted to buy the same model again but couldn't find it anywhere. Therefore, I tweeted Sekonda with #MyBrands and asked whether they still make the watch. Sekonda promptly replied letting me know that my watch had been discontinued, but sent me the link for the new updated version.

Some brands were not as helpful - I bought a packet of crisps from Tesco, which were over a week past their sell-by-date, I tweeted Tesco and although they replied, they simply asked me what the member of staff looked like and said they would report the incident to the store manager - this didn't help my annoyance!

Lastly, I was very disappointed with some brands I went out of my way to tweet and impress. For example I tweeted Whiskas with a video of my cat loving life, as she is about to eat some Whiskas - no response.

I tweeted Cravendale with a image of my cat attacking my cereal bowl (I like my cat) and made a joke about their television advert saying she 'didn't need thumbs' to get at my milk - again no response.

I also tweeted my local football team Reading Fc, with a positive view on the next game - no response. For those who didn't reply to me, I found it made me slightly frustrated with the brand and less loyal to them - especially if I could see that they were active on Twitter!

FACTORS OF THE STUDY

The size of the brand

I found that the size of the brand did effect whether they interacted with me. During my experiment I had a number of well established brands reply to me, including; Heineken, Berroca, Fosters and Colgate, however, what I found is that large global brands like Mcdonalds, Pepsi and Diet Coke with hundreds if not millions of followers, do not make time to reply to customers. Can we argue that this is fair enough, as they must get @mentioned hundreds of times a day?

The brand may not use Twitter 

I attempted to tweet holding companies (E.G GSK for Beechams) when a brand wasn't using Twitter, however, much like the large global brands, they didn't reply to me.

Demographic of the brand

I did find that if I was not the correct audience demographic for the brand, it effected whether they responded to me. For example I tweeted both Mac and Herbal Essences and they ignored me, but when I tweeted Fosters and Heineken they couldn't reply faster!

THE BRANDS AND THEIR MESSAGES

Tesco

Screen_shot_2012-12-21_at_17.41.13.png

Walkers:

Screen_shot_2012-12-21_at_17.40.58.png

 Berocca

Screen_shot_2012-12-21_at_18.01.21.png

Fosters 

Screen_shot_2012-12-21_at_17.33.40.png

Pret 

Screen_shot_2012-12-21_at_17.33.50.png

Heineken

Screen_shot_2012-12-21_at_17.34.06.png

Colgate

Screen_shot_2012-12-21_at_17.35.50.png

Sekonda

Screen_shot_2012-12-21_at_17.36.02.png

Pulse 8 

Screen_shot_2012-12-21_at_17.36.27.png

Swarovski 

Screen_shot_2012-12-21_at_17.36.44.png

Burtonwode 

Screen_shot_2012-12-21_at_17.43.46.png

O2

Screen_shot_2012-12-21_at_17.37.00.png

Tesco Christmas 

Screen_shot_2012-12-21_at_17.37.06.png

Yorkshire Tea

Screen_shot_2012-12-21_at_17.37.30.png

FULL LIST OF BRANDS

1. Berocca

2. Rice Krispies

3. Tesco

4. Burtonwode

5. McDonalds

6. GSK Beechams

7. Walkers

8. Tesco

9. Herbel Essences

10. Topman UK

11. Costa Coffee

12. Berocca USA

13. MAC

14. Pret

15. Fosters

16. Pret

17. Heineken

18. Galaxy Chocolate

19. Diet Coke

20. Pespi

21. Vans

22. Colgate

23. Sekonda

24. Ted Baker

25. Diesel

26. Nandos

27. Sommerset House

28. Madame Tussauds

29. River Island

30. Wicked

31. Pulse 8

32. Prezzo

33. Topshop

34. Swarovski

35. Pret

36. Innocent

37. O2

38. Tesco Christmas

39. Lynx Effect

40. Asda

41. Amazon

42. Red Bull

43. Next

44. Dairy Milk

45. Pringles

46. Cravendale

47. Yorkshire Tea

48. Whiskas

49. Love Film

50. Reading FC

VIEW THE EXPERIMENT

You can view the experiment on my Twitter JoeMiller_18 or with the hashtag MyBrands. Any questions? Please ask them below...

POSTED ON Dec-31-2012

WATCH A 5 MINUTE DEMO

Watch Demo